Constitution-Making in Times of Pandemia: Chile's Attempt to End Neoliberal Constitutionalism

Javier Couso

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Constitution-Making in Times of Pandemia:
Chile's Attempt to End Neoliberal Constitutionalism

Thursday, October 15, 2020
Time: 1:00 pm Pacific Time | CLAS Virtual Event

On October 25th, Chileans will vote in a critically important plebiscite. For the first time in the nation's history, the people will decide whether to have a new, democratically-enacted constitution, which would end the charter imposed by General Pinochet in 1980. Professor Couso will analyze the origins, relevance, and implications for Latin America in Chile's imminent constituent process, which is, unprecedented in many ways: it is the first to happen in times of pandemia; it could end what is perhaps the world's most neoliberal constitution; and, last but not least, it would include gender parity as a foundational principle.

Javier Couso received his Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from UC Berkeley.  He is Professor of Law and Director of the Constitutional Law Program at Universidad Diego Portales (Chile). Professor Couso is a specialist in comparative law and the sociology of law, with a focus on constitutional issues in Latin American countries including Chile, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru.

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

On the neoliberal nature of Chile's 1980 constitution

The incorporation of judicial review as a mechanism to stall reform

The writing on the flag says, in part, "We're tired, we're united" at this Chilean protest in October 2019. (Photo by Carlos Figueroa.)
The writing on the Chilean flag at this October 2019 protest in Santiago says, in part, "We're tired, we're united." (Photo by Carlos Figueroa.)