Natalie Diaz and Ailton Krenak: On Borderlands

Panel Discussion

Title Conditional: Natalie Diaz and Ailton Krenak: On Borderlands

With Natalia Brizuela and Beth Piatote

Friday, May 21, 2021
Time: 12:00 pm Pacific Time | CLAS Virtual Event

Registration Required | Add to Google Calendar

A conversation about colonial legacies of encampment and border making in the Americas, with a particular focus on the occupation and destruction of Indigenous lives and land. Indigenous artists and thinkers discuss migration/mobility as a practice constitutive of Indigenous forms of life, and itineraries of movement across human and nonhuman, visible and invisible borders in the context of settler colonial forms of spatial and human division, exclusion, segregation.

Natalie Diaz is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Diaz is Director of the Center for Imagination in the Borderlands and is the Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Chair in Modern and Contemporary Poetry at Arizona State University. 

Ailton Krenak is a Brazilian Indigenous intellectual and activist. A leading environmentalist and advocate for Indigenous rights, he is the author of Ideas to Postpone the End of the World (2019) and O amanhã não está à venda (2020).

Natalia Brizuela is professor in the departments of Film & Media and Spanish & Portuguese at UC Berkeley, where she is also a project director and co-principal investigator for the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs. She is also affiliated with the Program in Critical Theory and Gender and Women’s Studies. 

Beth Piatote is a scholar of Native American/Indigenous literature and law; a creative writer of fiction, poetry, plays, and essays; and an Indigenous language revitalization activist, specializing in Nez Perce language and literature. She is Nez Perce, enrolled with Colville Confederated Tribes.

Presented by the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs, and cosponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Vice Chancellor for Research, Arts Research Center, Center for Race and Gender, all at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.