Faculty Affiliate

Thad Dunning

Robson Professor in Political Science
The Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science
Thad Dunning is Robson Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley and directs the Center on the Politics of Development. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on comparative politics, political economy, and methodology. His substantive research in Latin America, Africa, and India has focused on ethnic voting, the consequences of political representation for minority groups, the role of intermediaries in distributing benefits in clientelist systems, and the consequences of natural resource wealth for democracy. His methodological writings focus on causal inference, statistical analysis, natural experiments, and the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Nadia Ellis

Associate Professor
English Department
Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies

Nadia Ellis received her PhD in English from Princeton University in 2008, specializing in postcolonial and modern British literature. She also has an MPhil in English from Oxford University and a BA in Literatures in English from the University of the West Indies (Mona) Jamaica.

Laura Enríquez

Professor, Associate Chair, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Department of Sociology

Laura Enríquez’ principal interest lies in the possibilities and dilemmas inherent in social transformation in Latin America. She has approached this interest through the lens of agriculture, whether in the shape of agrarian reform, food policy, or more general policies related to production in this sector of the economy and those who engage in it. More recently, her sociological lens has broadened to explore how the lack of such change has led to migration from the region to Europe. Her research sites have been Nicaragua, Cuba, Venezuela, and Italy, where she has engaged in interviewing...

Peter Evans

Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology

Peter Evans is best known for his work on the comparative political economy of national development, exemplified by his 1995 book Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation and a recent series of articles on the “21st Century Developmental State.” For the past several years he has been researching the ways in which social movements can mobilize transnationally to build a “counter-hegemonic globalization.” Among these movements, the global labor movement is a key actor. See his 2008 article, “Is an Alternative Globalization Possible?” and his 2010 article “Is it...

Paul V.A. Fine

Professor
Department of Integrative Biology

Professor Fine research investigates the origin and maintenance of Amazonian rain forest tree diversity. He is especially interested in the role that biotic interactions and environmental heterogeneity play in the morphological, functional, and genetic diversity of tropical trees, and how these factors influence the distribution and speciation of plants. The main thrust of his research is to understand the evolution and maintenance of edaphic specialization by trees to these divergent soil types, and the role of herbivores in this process.

Laurel E. Fletcher

Clinical Professor of Law; Clinical Program Director Director, International Human Rights Law Clinic; Co-Faculty Director, Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law
Berkeley Law School

Laurel E. Fletcher is Clinical Professor of Law at UC Berkeley, School of Law where she directs the International Human Rights Law Clinic. Fletcher is active in the areas of human rights, humanitarian law, international criminal justice, and transitional justice. As director of the International Human Rights Law Clinic, she utilizes an interdisciplinary, problem-based approach to human rights research, advocacy, and policy.

Fletcher has advocated on behalf of victims before international courts and tribunals, and has issued numerous human rights reports on topics ranging from sexual...

Gordon Frankie

Professor
Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Urban entomologyGordon W. Frankie is a professor and research entomologist at the University of California, Berkeley. His specialty is behavioral ecology of solitary bees in wildland, agricultural, and urban environments of California and Costa Rica, and he is particularly involved with questions of how people relate to bees and their plants in these environments, and how to raise human awareness about bee-plant relationships.

Lisa García-Bedolla

Professor
Graduate School of Education

Lisa García Bedolla is Berkeley's Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Dean of the Graduate Division, and a Professor in the Graduate School of Education. She uses the tools of social science to reveal the causes of educational and political inequalities in the United States, considering differences across the lines of ethnorace, gender, class, geography, et cetera. She believes an intersectional and interdisciplinary approach is critical to recognizing the complexity of the contemporary United States. She has used a variety of social science methods – participant observation, in-depth...

Cecile Gaubert

Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Cecile Gaubert is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research interests include spatial distribution of economic activity, firms and cities, and firms and trade. Professor Gaubert received her Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University in 2014.

Marcial Gonzalez

Associate Professor
English Department

Marcial González received a B.A. in English from Humboldt State University in 1992, an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Utah in 1994, and a Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University in 2000. He is the author of Chicano Novels and the Politics of Form: Race, Class, and Reification (U Michigan, 2009), and is currently writing a book on representations of migrant farm laborers in Chicana/o literature. He is also the co-editor of Dialectical Imaginaries: Materialist Approaches to U.S. Latino/a Literature in the Age of Neoliberalism (U...