75 Years Later

Destruction of Hiroshima following atomic bombing, August 6, 1945. (Photo from U.S. National Archives.)
Destruction of Hiroshima following atomic bombing, August 6, 1945. (Photo from U.S. National Archives.)

On August 6, 2020, the U.S. Air Force dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. The blast and subsequent firestorm killed between 70,000–80,000 people, with tens of thousands more dying of the radiation and other effects. Three days later, Nagasaki became the second and last city to be destroyed by a nuclear weapon.  Japan unconditionally surrendered on August 15, 1945.

 

CLAS has hosted colloquia on existential threats facing the Americas and the world, with an emphasis on nuclear proliferation and climate change.  Among the participants was William Perry, who served as U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1994–97, and has since been a consistent advocate for greater control and limitations on nuclear arms.


Perry also extolled the "most important treaty you've never heard of," an agreement prohibiting the spread of nuclear weapons among Latin American signatories. Celso Amorim, a former Brazilian Minister of Foreign Affairs and of Defense, talked about that treaty, and the process surrounding it, in a visit to CLAS in 2017.

Celso Amorim in 2016. (Photo courtesy of Partido dos Trabalhadores.)
Celso Amorim speaking for CLAS, April 2017. (Photo by Peg Skorpinski.)