Race Beyond Borders: Japanese Migration to Chile, 1900–1950

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Student Research Reports, Summer 2018

 The author at the Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Santiago. This very moving museum is dedicated exposing and remembering the horrible human rights abuses committed during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile between 1973 and 1990. The museum is quite groundbreaking for its critique of Chile’s own history. (Photo courtesy of Evan Fernández.)
The author at the Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Santiago. This very moving museum is dedicated exposing and remembering the horrible human rights abuses committed during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile between 1973 and 1990. The museum is quite groundbreaking for its critique of Chile’s own history. (Photo courtesy of Evan Fernández.)

Race Beyond Borders: Japanese Migration to Chile, 1900–1950
By Evan Fernández

This project examines the history of Japanese migration to Chile in the first half of the twentieth century. This was my first time researching in Chile. My research seeks to illuminate this narrative and asks the question of how Japanese migration influenced the broader relationship between race and Chilean society in the early twentieth century. I pursued this topic by conducting documentary research in various Chilean archives. The unique approach of this project is to consider Latin America as part of an international context with international actors. I learned a lot in this trip about both the topic I wanted to study and also about how to do research in Latin America. My advice for anyone else seeking to conduct similar research would be to have patience in the research process and get to know researchers in the country in which you are studying. I am hoping to turn my research into an article-length research paper.

The official changing of the guard in Santiago in front of the Casa Moneda (the Chilean equivalent of the White House). (Photo by Evan Fernández.)
The official changing of the guard in Santiago in front of the Casa Moneda (the Chilean equivalent of the White House). (Photo by Evan Fernández.)

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