Semester Calendar

Ramón Grosfoguel

Part of Mobilities and Migration Across the Americas

The exclusion of migrants and their descendants based on racism and xenophobia has a long historical tradition, particularly in the United States and Europe. The recent spike of populism and the securitization of borders highlight the urgency of discussing these topics in an intertwined and transregional perspective. Ramón Grosfoguel will address related questions in his lecture, and Julia Roth will provide a contextual analysis of his presentation.

Ramón Grosfoguel is a professor of Chicano/Latino Studies in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Julia Roth is a professor for American Studies with a focus on Gender Studies and Inter-American Studies at Bielefeld University, Germany. 

Friday, January 29, 2021, 9:00 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

Film Series

In the last decade, Brazil has seen a proliferation of new filmmakers, film festivals, and critics, fostered by the progressive cultural initiatives instituted between 2003 and 2016. In conjunction with Film Quarterly's just-published dossier on new Brazilian cinema and CLAS, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive presents highlights from this remarkable output, including works by Black, Indigenous, and queer filmmakers and artists from previously underrepresented regions.

More on the films and how to watch

Monday, February 8, 2021, On demand, Jan 21-Mar 7, 2021
Virtual event

Panel Discussion

In honor of Argentine philosopher Maria Lugones, this round table will discuss the politics of epistemological decolonization, particularly with respect to philosophical and spiritual thought. The dialogue will engage a deeper understanding of how the project of multiple/plural philosophies/worldviews/ways of knowing directly contribute to a classroom, campus and more broadly, national, climate of knowledge and respect for POC cultures and existence.  with PJ DiPietro, Mariana Ortega, Chela Sandoval, and Gabriela Veronelli.

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time
Virtual event

Radical Kinship Series

This roundtable discussion looks at Afro-Latinx feminist practices as they play out in online and offline spaces. This roundtable asks: How has social media expanded the ways Black Latinxs see themselves alongside others in the Black diaspora? What might a Black future look like if we merge Afro-Latinx URL with Afro-Latinx IRL spaces? And, who are the Black feminists in Latin America and the Caribbean redefining their own thinking?

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera is an AfroDominicana writer, musician and artist, known for advocating for LatiNegra visibility and rights on social media and for her unfiltered social critique. Janel Martinez is an entrepreneur and multimedia journalist. A Honduran-American of Garifuna descent, she is the founder of an online destination geared toward Afro-Latinas. Moderator Alan Pelaez Lopez is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley, as well as an Afro-Indigenous poet and artist from a coastal Zapotec community in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.

VIDEO

Thursday, February 18, 2021, 4:00 pm Pacific Time
Virtual event

AfroLatinx Voices Series

How might we re-write the history and historiography of religion, race, and art in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world? Prof. Andrea Guerrero-Mosquera will discuss the role of historians in uncovering and debating ideas about the past of people of African descent during the colonial period. She invites us to consider the ways art, material culture and performance can help us understand how people lived and experienced different forms of religiosity in the past, and how these practices helped develop different forms of Catholicism and cultural changes across the Atlantic world. She will also share her experience with the Red Iberoamericana de Historiadoras (Ibero-American Network of Historians), a digital humanities initiative that seeks to promote dialogues and connect historians across the globe.

Dr. Andrea Mosquera-Guerrero is a researcher at the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (National System of Researchers, Mexico) and co-founder of the Iberoamerican Network of Female Historians.

VIDEO

Thursday, February 25, 2021, 12:30 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

GHI Lecture Series

Part of Mobilities and Migrations Across the Americas

This is the second event in a four-part lecture series on “Mobilities and Migration across the Americas,” organized by the German Historical Institute. Bringing together scholars from Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, and Europe, this lecture series aims to provide a platform for engaging and inspiring interdisciplinary debates. 

Kateřina Březinová is a professor at the Department of International Relations and European Studies at the Metropolitan University Prague. Luicy Pedroza is a professor-researcher at the Centro Internacional at the Colegio de México. 

Friday, February 26, 2021, 9:00 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

Panel de discusión

Este seminario web busca generar un diálogo entre los estudiosos nahuas del Municipio de Chicontepec, norte de Veracruz, en torno a sus investigaciones actuales que involucran temas como el idioma, la salud, la religión y el contacto con las culturas mestizas. Los académicos hablarán y reflexionarán sobre la cultura nahua contemporánea, enfocándose en las comunidades nahuas del municipio de Chicontepec. 

Abelardo de la Cruz de la Cruz es instructor asociado de idiomas y culturas del mundo, en la Universidad de Utah y profesor de náhuatl en UC Berkeley.  Eduardo de la Cruz Cruz es director de IDIEZ y candidato a doctorado en la Universidad de Varsovia. Jacinta Toribio Torres tiene un PhD de la Universidad Veracruzana Intercultural.

Más información

Friday, February 26, 2021, 12:00 pm Hora del Pacífico
Virtual event

Víctor Cata and Rosemary Beam de Azcona 

Nácasinu Diidxa is a collection of short stories that touches on themes of religion and gender. The first edition was bilingual Isthmus Zapotec-Spanish edition, and it has since been translated into English. In this conversation, the author, Víctor Cata, and the translator, Rosemary Beam de Azcona, will discuss the significance of translating from Zapotec into colonial languages such and Spanish and English.

Víctor Cata is a writer and translator. Rosemary Beam de Azcona is a professor of scientific research at the National School of Anthropology and History (Mexico). 

Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 4:10 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

DocuLatino

Directed by Anabel Rodríguez (Venezuela, 2020)

On Lake Maracaibo, beneath the mysterious silent Catatumbo lightning, the village of Congo Mirador is preparing for parliamentary elections. This once-prosperous fishing community is now sinking into the sediment, unraveling after years of criminal pollution and government neglect – a reflection of all the flaws of contemporary Venezuela. Focusing on two fierce, independent women who epitomize opposing sides of this vulnerable community, Rodríguez Ríos’s film is a stunning microcosm of a global battle to safeguard cultural heritage and retain political relevancy. 99 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Saturday, March 6, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

A Screening to Support CLAS

Directed by Kleber Mendonça Filho and Juliano Dornelles (Brazil, 2019)

Poster for the film Bacurau. (Image courtesy of Kino Lorber.)

We provide the film; you provide the popcorn – and a gift to CLAS! 

CLAS is asking for your help. This year for Big Give, Berkeley’s once-a-year fundraising event, we are presenting a special showing of Bacarau, winner of the Jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival. This is a unique opportunity to support CLAS by buying a ticket for a film in our CineLatino series. Your support will help us continue to offer free film screenings in the future. 

Thursday, March 11, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

DocuLatino

Directed by Claudia Sparrow (Peru, 2019)

Máxima tells the incredible story of 2016 environmental Goldman Prize winner Máxima Acuña and her family, who own a small, remote plot in the Peruvian Highlands. The Acuñas rely solely on the environment for their livelihood, but their land sits directly in the path of a multi-billion-dollar project run by one of the world’s largest gold-mining corporations. Faced with intimidation, violence, and criminal prosecution, the film follows Maxima’s tireless fight for justice, taking her from the Peruvian Supreme Court to the doors of the World Bank in Washington, D.C. Máxima sings of her love of the land in the face of widespread oppression of indigenous people and relentless attempts to destroy environmental resources that the world relies on. 88 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Sunday, March 14, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Yuliana Kenfield

Andean college students in Cusco, Peru struggle to overcome sociolinguistic discrimination against Quechua-Spanish bilingualism during their pursuit of higher education. Dr. Yuliana Kenfield's presentation will illustrate the ways students' efforts and visions create spaces for their Quechua practices to flourish despite hindrances from their university. 

Yuliana Kenfield is a Quechua scholar, bilingual teacher and immigration paralegal.

Wednesday, March 17, 2021, 4:10 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

DocuLatino

Directed by Simón González (Colombia, 2020)

This film took a decade to complete. It is about love, affection, respect, humility, temperance and courage; about balance with oneself and the other. It is a tour through the mountains, jungles and plains where the jaguar has directly engaged with humans, creating a journey of chants, myths and cultural traditions which narrate the history of the human-jaguar relationship, and speak to the importance of preserving this severely threatened species. 72 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Saturday, March 20, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

GHI Lecture Series

Part of Mobilities and Migration across the Americas

This is the third event in a four-part lecture series on “Mobilities and Migration across the Americas,” organized by the German Historical Institute. Bringing together scholars from Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, and Europe, this lecture series aims to provide a platform for engaging and inspiring interdisciplinary debates. 

Andra B. Chastain is an assistant professor of history at the Washington State University Vancouver. Dhan Zunino Singh is a professor at the Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (Argentina). Moderator Bianca Freire-Medeiros is a sociology professor at University of São Paulo (Brazil), and moderator Mario Peters is a research fellow in American and Transatlantic History at the GHI Washington.

Friday, March 26, 2021, 9:00 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

DocuLatino

Directed by Jaime Murciego (Bolivia, 2020)

Five Bolivian Indigenous women are involved in a unique expedition. As a symbol of liberation and empowerment, they propose to climb the highest mountain in the Americas. They are more than climbers, they are brave women who find, on the mountain, a space to feel free, happy and alive. Their adventure will show the world an inspiring way to be a woman, to live tradition and to relate to Mother Earth. 82 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

More information

Sunday, March 28, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Virtual Conference

“Biomigrations” is a way to reconsider notions of Life and Movement. It is a way to explore one’s community, self, and spirit(s) through violence, refusal, and Indigenous rooting. It is premised on the idea that humans need to know how we are enacting structural pain(s) to humans and non-humans. The conference’s goal will be to collaboratively connect U.S. scholars, community members, and artists through the lenses of Food Sovereignty, Food Security, and Food Justice.

More information

Friday, April 2, 2021, All day, April 2-3
Virtual event

CineLatino

Directed by Diego Mondaca (Bolivia, 2020)

Between 1932 and 1935, there was severe military conflict on the border between Bolivia and Paraguay, because of suspicions there might be oil. This historical drama about the Chaco war focuses on a small Bolivian regiment wandering across the inhospitable, dry Chaco plain. The group of Bolivian, Aymara and Quechua Indigenous soldiers are led by gruff German commander Hans Kundt, who refuses to accept how fruitless his mission has become. Despite dwindling rations, dissidents, and fights among his men, he is determined to continue. Isolation, despair, and hunger grow with every day, every hellish march, and every hastily erected camp. The miserable war transforms into a battle with their own demons, all with scarcely a gunshot heard in this sensuous film. 77 minutes. Spanish, Quechua and Aymara with English subtitles. 

Bolivia’s candidate for the 2021 Academy Awards.  

More information

Saturday, April 3, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

CineLatino

Directed by Aeden O’Connor (Honduras, 2019)

The passion for soccer goes beyond life or death. 90 Minutos, a rare film from Honduras, tells four interlinking stories of drama, romance and suspense all tied together by Honduras – and the world’s greatest passion: soccer. 90 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Sunday, April 11, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

CineLatino

Directed by Rodrigo Sepúlveda (Chile, 2020)

In Chile, 1986, a few days before Pinochet's attempted assassination, we witness a love story between "the Queen of the Corner," a middle-aged transgender woman who embroiders tablecloths for military wives, and a young guerrilla member of the Manuel Rodríguez Patriotic Front. Under the Pinochet dictatorship, among gunshots and boleros, a passionate relationship flourishes. 93 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Registration and more information

Saturday, April 17, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

AfroLatinx Voices Series

Black activists and academics across the disciplines have long known Latin America and the Caribbean to be far from a racial paradise. However, the region continues to hold a global perception as a racial democracy, on the basis of national narratives of a congenial race mixture that makes "race" itself appear to be an obsolete category for critique. Reinforced by revisionist histories manifested by the state, popular culture, and everyday discourse, whiteness in Latin America and the Caribbean is characterized in these narratives as more benevolent than its North American iterations. This cultural and biological mixture between people of European, Africans, and Native descent is often described as mutually constructive, benign, and even loving, allowing for the continued dismissal of whiteness as a structure and lived experience circumscribed by a complex system of privileges rigged against Indigenous and Afrodescendant peoples in the region. 

Erika Denise Edwards is an associate professor of Latin American History at the University of North Carolina. Isar Godreau is a researcher at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Puerto Rico at Cayey. Patricia de Santana Pinho is a Brazilian social scientist and associate professor in the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies at UC Santa Cruz. Moderator John Mundell is a Ph.D. candidate in African American & African Diaspora Studies at UC Berkeley and co-founder of the Blackness in Latin America Working Group.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021, 10:00 am PT
CLAS Virtual Event

CineLatino

Directed by Patricio Guzmán (France/Chile, 2019)

In the film that won Best Documentary Award at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, Director Patricio Guzmán (Nostalgia for the Light) examines the enduring legacies of Chile’s 1973 coup, using the imposing landscape of the Andes as a focal point. The majestic mountains loom over the countryside, but like many parts of the country, much of the range is privately owned and off limits to the people. 84 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Registration and more information

Sunday, April 25, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

GHI Lecture Series

Part of Mobilities and Migration across the Americas

This is the fourth event in a four-part lecture series on “Mobilities and Migration across the Americas,” organized by the German Historical Institute. Bringing together scholars from Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, and Europe, this lecture series aims to provide a platform for engaging and inspiring interdisciplinary debates. 

Melina Piglia is a researcher at CONICET (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas), and Universidad del Mar del Plata (Argentina). Leonie Schuster from Kiel University (Germany). Peter Soland is an assistant professor of History and Anthropology at the Southeast Missouri State University. Moderator Stefan Rinke is a professor of Latin American History at the Freie Universität (Berlin, Germany), and moderator Mario Peters is a research fellow in American and Transatlantic History at the GHI Washington.

Registration and more information

Friday, April 30, 2021, 9:00 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

Panel Discussion

How can we more effectively link scholarship and struggles for justice in the global south?

Join Berkeley's Guatemala Scholar-Activist Working Group for a conversation about current human rights challenges in Guatemala, and ways Indigenous communities are organizing for justice. Iduvina Hernández will discuss current political struggles in Guatemala. Giovanni Batz will discuss his research and work in solidarity with Maya-Ixil and Land Defenders. Finally, we will hear from the Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala about ongoing cross-border solidarity initiatives.  

Tuesday, May 11, 2021, 3:00 pm Pacific Time
Virtual event

Panel Discussion

In Colombia, a nationwide protest has been met with deadly force. Colombian military and police officers have deployed an assault – the deadliest in the country’s recent history – against the demonstrations, murdering at least 26 people and injuring at least 900 more. This event brings together scholars and human rights activists for a conversation on the roots of the unrest, broader human rights crises, and how to support the protesters’ demands. 

Francisco Gutiérrez Sanín is a sociologist and professor at Universidad Nacional de Colombia and a columnist for El Espectador, one of Colombia’s largest newspapers. Alejandro Lanz is a lawyer, human rights defender, and executive co-director of the Bogota-based organization Temblores ONG. Gimena Sánchez is the leading Colombian human rights advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA). Lizeth Montero Piedrahita is a human rights lawyer and social leader from the Cauca region of Colombia.

Registration and more information

Monday, May 17, 2021, 3:00 pm Pacific Time
Virtual Event

Panel Discussion

With Natalia Brizuela and Beth Piatote

A conversation about colonial legacies of encampment and border making in the Americas, with a particular focus on the occupation and destruction of Indigenous lives and land. Indigenous artists and thinkers discuss migration/mobility as a practice constitutive of Indigenous forms of life, and itineraries of movement across human and nonhuman, visible and invisible borders in the context of settler colonial forms of spatial and human division, exclusion, segregation.

Natalie Diaz is Mojave, an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe, and Director of the Center for Imagination in the Borderlands and is the Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Chair in Modern and Contemporary Poetry at Arizona State University. Ailton Krenak is a Brazilian Indigenous intellectual and activist. A leading environmentalist and advocate for Indigenous rights. Natalia Brizuela is professor in the departments of Film & Media and Spanish & Portuguese at UC Berkeley. Beth Piatote is a scholar of Native American/Indigenous literature and law; a creative writer of fiction, poetry, plays, and essays; and an Indigenous language revitalization activist, specializing in Nez Perce language and literature. 

Registration and more information

Friday, May 21, 2021, 12:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Panel de discusión

La grave crisis humanitaria que enfrenta Colombia en los pasados meses es reflejo de una larga historia de conflictos sociales sin resolver. En este panel, discutiremos desde las ciencias sociales y naturales, cómo la ciencia se ha interesado en investigar los efectos de la guerra sobre la biodiversidad y proponer desde allí acciones para la paz. 

Iokiñe Rodríguez es socióloga y profesora titular de Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo de la Universidad de East Anglia. Diego Calderón Franco es biólogo ornitólogo, fundador de Colombia Birding, y promotor de la importancia de la ciencia para la reconciliación. Lina Pinto García es bióloga, científica social, e investigadora postdoctoral del Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios sobre el Desarrollo, Universidad de los Andes. Pablo Palacios es biólogo herpetólogo, estudiante doctoral, y especialista en anfibios del Pacífico Colombiano. Trabaja con comunidades afrocolombianas. 

El evento será en español con interpretación simultánea al inglés. The event will be in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. 

Tuesday, June 1, 2021, 7:30 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

Virtual Conference

Nahuatl is the language spoken by the Mexica or Aztecs, and it is still spoken today by about a million people in Mexico. This free webinar features new research and teaching on Mesoamerica by three native-speakers of the Nahuatl language, three advanced students at UCLA, four scholars from Mexico and Los Angeles, and three high school teachers from the Los Angeles Unified School District. 

Presentations will be in Nahuatl, Spanish, and English or a combination of the 3 languages. 

More information

Friday, June 4, 2021, 9:00 am Pacific Time
Virtual event

Summer Cine

Directed by Fernanda Valadez (Mexico, 2020)

Middle-aged Magdalena has lost contact with her son after he took off with a friend from their town of Guanajuato to cross the border into the U.S., hopeful to find work. Desperate to find out what happened to him—and to know whether or not he’s even alive—she embarks on an ever-expanding and increasingly dangerous journey to discover the truth. At the same time, a young man has returned to Mexico after being deported from the U.S., and eventually his path converges with Magdalena’s. 94 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Winner of the Gotham Award for Best International Feature

Registration and more information

Sunday, June 6, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Summer Cine

499

Directed by Rodrigo Reyes (Mexico, 2020)

The year 2021 marks the 500-year anniversary of the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. 499 offers a bold, hybrid cinema experience, mixing non-fictional and performative elements with components of a road movie. Through the eyes of a ghostly conquistador, the director recreates Hernán Cortez’s epic journey from the coasts of Veracruz to the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, the site of contemporary Mexico City. As the anachronistic fictional character interacts with real victims of Mexico’s failed drug wars, the filmmaker portrays the country’s current humanitarian crisis as part of a brutal and unfinished colonial project, still in motion, 499 years later. 87 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Winner of the 2021 Latin American Studies Association Award for Best Film

Saturday, June 12, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Summer Cine

Directed by Bruno Santamaría (Mexico, 2020)

In the small town of El Roblito, wild horses gallop through the streets and children roam the nearby mangrove forests. But 16-year-old Ñoño has a secret: Ñoño loves to dress in women’s clothes. When a violent situation disrupts the seemingly idyllic atmosphere, with its suggestion of corrosive machismo, Ñoño takes the bold step of coming out to his parents. In this gorgeously photographed snapshot of rural Mexico, cinematographer-turned-director Bruno Santamaría reveals repression, violence, and beauty in equal measures and the exquisite story of an individual who bravely defies the gender norms of their society. 75 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles. 

Winner of the New Directors Award at the 18th edition of the Vancouver Latin American Film Festival

Registration and more information

Sunday, June 20, 2021, 5:00 - 9:00 pm Pacific Time
CLAS Virtual Event

Panel Discussion

En noviembre de 2020, Guatemala y otros países centroamericanos fueron azotados por los huracanes Eta e Iota, de categoría 4 que azotaron en solo 2 semanas. Los huracanes cobraron la vida de 65 personas, lo que ilustra cómo las comunidades Indígenas y rurales de Guatemala viven en la intersección precaria de la emergencia climática, la agitación política y la respuesta fallida al desastre de los gobiernos.

En este foro virtual, escucharemos a panelistas en dos regiones de Guatemala que se vieron particularmente afectadas por los huracanes: la región Ixil en el norte de Guatemala y la región Ch'orti’ en el oriente del país. Los panelistas discutirán los impactos de los huracanes, el proceso de recuperación y las inequidades estructurales que agravaron los devastadores impactos de los huracanes. 

Monday, July 12, 2021, 12:00 pm