Bay Area Latin America Forum

Harley Shaiken

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March 1932 was not a good time to come to Detroit. Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo arrived in the city in the midst of a plummeting economy and social upheaval. The artists painted during grim economic times, yet Rivera’s dream of a popular international art has found an enthusiastic new audience, and Kahlo has become iconic throughout the world. In this talk, Harley Shaiken will explore the ways in which art transcends borders.

Harley Shaiken is Class of 1930 Professor of Letters and Science and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

PHOTOS

Wednesday, February 5, 2020, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Charles Walker

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The brutal guerrilla war initiated by the Shining Path and the Peruvian government’s fierce response led to illegal mass detentions, disappearances, and massacres. The human rights groups that quickly emerged in response faced enormous challenges, both in the difficulty of tracking events in rural areas of the Andean highlands and the necessity of creating new paradigms and language. Those groups confronted a very different situation than their well-known and influential counterparts in Argentina and Chile. Their efforts culminated in Peru’s acclaimed 2003 Truth and Reconciliation Commission Informe Final.

Charles Walker is Professor of History, Director of the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas, and holds the MacArthur Foundation Endowed Chair in International Human Rights at UC Davis.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Irma A. Velásquez Nimatuj

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To examine the topic of migration, we must reflect on issues of race and indigenous peoples simultaneously. This is a complex task, since the media, public institutions, and even academia address these topics separately. In this talk, Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj will examine the theme of migration from an indigenous perspective, within a larger context of racial oppression.  

Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj is a journalist and activist, and the first Maya-K’iche’ woman to earn a doctorate in social anthropology in Guatemala. 

Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Ronald Rael

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Ronald Rael will discuss how the borderlands are a site for creative production and will share stories from the book Borderwall as Architecture, an important re-examination of what the 700 miles of physical barrier that divides the United States of America from the United Mexican States is, and what it could be. 

Ronald Rael is the Eva Li Memorial Chair, Professor, and Acting Chair of Architecture and Affiliate Professor of Art Practice at UC Berkeley.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street